Take DEXILANT any time of day, with or without food

When taking DEXILANT, remember:

Apple
  • Swallow the capsules whole.
  • If you have trouble swallowing DEXILANT capsules whole, it's OK to open the capsules and sprinkle the contents on a tablespoon of applesauce. Just be sure to swallow the applesauce mixture right away.
  • Don't chew the granules in the applesauce mixture and don't store it for later use.
  • Be sure to take DEXILANT exactly as it was prescribed and for the full length of time.

Kids Age 12 to 17 Years

Being a 12 to 17-year-old often means having a busy schedule. DEXILANT is a GERD medicine that can be taken once daily—any time of day, with or without food.

When taking DEXILANT, kids age 12 to 17 years should remember:

  • Swallow the capsules whole.
  • If they have trouble swallowing DEXILANT capsules whole, it's OK to open the capsules and sprinkle the contents on a tablespoon of applesauce. Just be sure they swallow the applesauce mixture right away.
  • Don't chew the granules in the applesauce mixture and don't store it for later use.
  • Be sure they take DEXILANT exactly as it was prescribed and for the full length of time.

Not actual
patients

See who can
take DEXILANT

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Mom and son standing

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Important Safety Information

DEXILANT may not be right for everyone. Do not take DEXILANT if you are allergic to DEXILANT or any of its ingredients or taking a medicine that contains rilpivirine. Serious allergic reactions have been reported.

DEXILANT may not be right for everyone. Do not take DEXILANT if you are allergic to DEXILANT or any of its ingredients or taking a medicine that contains rilpivirine. Serious allergic reactions have been reported. Tell your doctor if you get any of the following symptoms with DEXILANT: rash, face swelling, throat tightness, or difficulty breathing. Symptom relief does not rule out other serious stomach conditions. A type of kidney problem called acute interstitial nephritis may develop at any time during treatment with proton pump inhibitor (PPI) medicines, including DEXILANT. Call your doctor right away if you have a decrease in the amount that you urinate or if you have blood in your urine. DEXILANT may increase your risk of getting severe diarrhea. Call your doctor right away if you have watery stool, stomach pain, and fever that does not go away. People who are taking multiple daily doses of PPI medicines for a long period of time (a year or longer) may have an increased risk of fractures of the hip, wrist, or spine. Some people who take PPIs may develop new or worsening of certain types of lupus erythematosus. Call your doctor right away if you have joint pain or rash on your cheeks or arms that gets worse in the sun. Talk with your doctor about the possibility of Vitamin B-12 deficiency if you have been on DEXILANT for a long time (more than 3 years). Low magnesium levels can happen in some people who take a PPI medicine. The most common side effects of DEXILANT in adults were diarrhea (4.8%), stomach pain (4.0%), nausea (2.9%), common cold (1.9%), vomiting (1.6%), and gas (1.6%). The most common side effects in children 12 to 17 years of age were headache, stomach pain, diarrhea, and pain or swelling (inflammation) in your mouth, nose or throat. DEXILANT and certain other medicines can affect each other. Tell your doctor about all the medicines you take, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. Tell your doctor if you are taking methotrexate, rilpivirine, atazanavir, nelfinavir, saquinavir, digoxin, product containing iron, erlotinib, dasatinib, nilotinib, mycophenolate mofetil, ketoconazole/itraconazole, tacrolimus, St. John’s Wort or rifampin. If you are taking DEXILANT with warfarin, you may need to be monitored because serious risks could occur.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

DEXILANT (dexlansoprazole) 30 mg and 60 mg delayed-release capsules

Prescription DEXILANT capsules are used in children age 12 to 17 years for 4 weeks to treat heartburn related to GERD, for up to 8 weeks to heal acid-related damage to the lining of the esophagus (called erosive esophagitis or EE), and for up to 16 weeks to continue healing of EE and relief of heartburn. It is not known if DEXILANT is safe and effective in children under age 12 years. DEXILANT is not effective for symptoms of GERD in children under 1 year of age.

In adults, persistent heartburn two or more days a week, despite treatment and diet changes, could be gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), also known as acid reflux disease (ARD). Prescription DEXILANT capsules are used in adults for 4 weeks to treat heartburn related to GERD, for up to 8 weeks to heal acid-related damage to the lining of the esophagus, and for up to 6 months to continue healing of EE and relief of heartburn. Most damage (erosions) heals in 4–8 weeks.

Individual results may vary.

Talk to your doctor or healthcare professional. Please see full Prescribing Information, including Medication Guide for DEXILANT.

Important Safety Information

DEXILANT may not be right for everyone. Do not take DEXILANT if you are allergic to DEXILANT or any of its ingredients or taking a medicine that contains rilpivirine. Serious allergic reactions have been reported.

DEXILANT may not be right for everyone. Do not take DEXILANT if you are allergic to DEXILANT or any of its ingredients or taking a medicine that contains rilpivirine. Serious allergic reactions have been reported. Tell your doctor if you get any of the following symptoms with DEXILANT: rash, face swelling, throat tightness, or difficulty breathing. Symptom relief does not rule out other serious stomach conditions. A type of kidney problem called acute interstitial nephritis may develop at any time during treatment with proton pump inhibitor (PPI) medicines, including DEXILANT. Call your doctor right away if you have a decrease in the amount that you urinate or if you have blood in your urine. DEXILANT may increase your risk of getting severe diarrhea. Call your doctor right away if you have watery stool, stomach pain, and fever that does not go away. People who are taking multiple daily doses of PPI medicines for a long period of time (a year or longer) may have an increased risk of fractures of the hip, wrist, or spine. Some people who take PPIs may develop new or worsening of certain types of lupus erythematosus. Call your doctor right away if you have joint pain or rash on your cheeks or arms that gets worse in the sun. Talk with your doctor about the possibility of Vitamin B-12 deficiency if you have been on DEXILANT for a long time (more than 3 years). Low magnesium levels can happen in some people who take a PPI medicine. The most common side effects of DEXILANT in adults were diarrhea (4.8%), stomach pain (4.0%), nausea (2.9%), common cold (1.9%), vomiting (1.6%), and gas (1.6%). The most common side effects in children 12 to 17 years of age were headache, stomach pain, diarrhea, and pain or swelling (inflammation) in your mouth, nose or throat. DEXILANT and certain other medicines can affect each other. Tell your doctor about all the medicines you take, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. Tell your doctor if you are taking methotrexate, rilpivirine, atazanavir, nelfinavir, saquinavir, digoxin, product containing iron, erlotinib, dasatinib, nilotinib, mycophenolate mofetil, ketoconazole/itraconazole, tacrolimus, St. John’s Wort or rifampin. If you are taking DEXILANT with warfarin, you may need to be monitored because serious risks could occur.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

DEXILANT (dexlansoprazole) 30 mg and 60 mg delayed-release capsules

Prescription DEXILANT capsules are used in children age 12 to 17 years for 4 weeks to treat heartburn related to GERD, for up to 8 weeks to heal acid-related damage to the lining of the esophagus (called erosive esophagitis or EE), and for up to 16 weeks to continue healing of EE and relief of heartburn. It is not known if DEXILANT is safe and effective in children under age 12 years. DEXILANT is not effective for symptoms of GERD in children under 1 year of age.

In adults, persistent heartburn two or more days a week, despite treatment and diet changes, could be gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), also known as acid reflux disease (ARD). Prescription DEXILANT capsules are used in adults for 4 weeks to treat heartburn related to GERD, for up to 8 weeks to heal acid-related damage to the lining of the esophagus, and for up to 6 months to continue healing of EE and relief of heartburn. Most damage (erosions) heals in 4–8 weeks.

Individual results may vary.

Talk to your doctor or healthcare professional. Please see full Prescribing Information, including Medication Guide for DEXILANT.